• Free fall

    If we let two objects of different weight to fall, which one is going to reach the floor faster? This exhibit provides a great opportunity to learn about gravity and the experiment that Galileo did, on the Tower of Pisa, all those years ago, to prove that all objects fall at the same time! With a funny and informative picture of Galileo’s experiment, two magnets controlled by a button to drop two iron balls at the exact same time and two wooden keyboards, in order to also ‘hear’ that the balls fall at the same time! This exhibit has been one of the most popular of the exhibition!

  • Robot Acrobat

    How is it possible, that the acrobat stays in place, no matter how much we make him lean forward or backwards? The answer lies on the balance stick that he holds in his hands, and more specifically to the balls hanging from his stick. They create a center of gravity that finds itself lower than the spot where the acrobat touches the rope. Therefore, he can’t fall! This beautifully constructed exhibit, contains the robot acrobat, the rope, the stick that keeps him in place and a button that controls the movement of the robot!

  • Torque

    Torque is a measure of the force that can cause an object to rotate about an axis. Just as force is what causes an object to accelerate in linear kinematics, torque is what causes an object to acquire angular acceleration. This particular exhibit is the perfect example of how the torque works, and how it grows when the object is farther from the center of rotation! The guests can enjoy putting the sinkers in different positions trying to create the perfect balance between the two sides!

  • Moment of Inertia

    When a body is rotating, or free to rotate, around an axis, a torque must be applied to change its angular momentum. The amount of torque needed to cause any given angular acceleration is proportional to the moment of inertia of the body. Moment of inertia characterizes the resistance of a body to change its rotational motion. The moment of inertia depends on how mass is distributed around an axis of rotation, and will vary depending on the chosen axis. In order to make that easily conceived by the children we created this exhibit of an inclined surface, where two different objects are set free to roll and they reach the end in different timing due to the fact that their mass is differently distributed.

  • Chaotic pendulum

    In nature is not always easy to predict the movement of an object. Sometimes, if we now the previous situation, we can predict quite accurately the movement of an object, but in some cases that is impossible! Our Chaotic Pendulum is the perfect example of this fact! If you turn it slowly or very fast, its movement will be easy to predict, whereas if you turn it in a medium speed it will be impossible to predict the movement of its branches.

  • Tsunami

    A tsunami, also known as a seismic sea wave, is a series of waves in a water body caused by the displacement of a large volume of water, generally in an ocean or a large lake. Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and other underwater explosions, landslides, glacier callings, meteorite impacts and other disturbances above or below water all have the potential to generate a tsunami. Unlike normal ocean waves which are generated by wind, or tides which are generated by the gravitational pull of the Moon and Sun, a tsunami is generated by the displacement of water. This is one of our most impressive and massive exhibits, with an intelligent mechanism, and beautiful setting, containing houses and a boat, that all guests absolutely adore!

  • Decibel

    This extremely impressive device is a perfect way to measure the intensity of sound, in simple words, the energy provoked by the sound waves. With a clever mechanism and a microphone adjusted to count the noises of the environment, guest can give their best effort to make the loudest noise! It’s a very popular exhibit, and trough it guests can learn a lot about sound waves, how we measure them and which sound are considered very high or very low for the human ear and above which intensity is probable that it will cause harm on the human hearing.

  • Centrifugal force in Liquids

    The centrifugal force, is actually an inertial force, it doesn’t really exist, is the force that appears when an object spins fast around itself. It’s  in easy words, the resistance that an object exhibits, when its kinetic energy is changing! It’s a very common fact that when we turn something fast, it appears that it flies around! This beautiful exhibit, uses a wheel to turn the system with the water and makes the centrifugal force completely visible from the impressed guests!

  • Centrifugal force

    The centrifugal force, is actually an inertial force, it doesn’t really exist, is the force that appears when an object spins fast around itself. It’s  in easy words, the resistance that an object exhibits, when its kinetic energy is changing! It’s a very common fact that when we turn something fast, it appears that it flies around! This beautiful exhibit, uses a wheel to turn the system with the water and makes the centrifugal force completely visible from the impressed guests!

  • Scuba diver

    This amazing exhibit uses the power of pressure over air and is an excellent example of how divers manage to move up and down underwater, winning over the up-thrust. The scuba diver is a big cylinder, filled with water, with an impressive background and a shark on the bottom. Inside a scuba diver floats near the surface. Using a lever, we put pressure on the whole system making the air inside the diver’s aqualung to diminish in volume and eventually cause the diver to sink!  A specially designed exhibit that all guests adore!

  • Viscosity

    The viscosity of a fluid is a measure of its resistance to gradual deformation by shear stress or tensile stress. For liquids, it corresponds to the informal concept of “thickness”; for example, honey has a much higher viscosity than water. Our exhibit gives the perfect proof of this fact, by exposing three tubes with different liquids, such as water, soap and glycerin and three iron balls that fall, through them, with the turn of a wheel! By the different time each ball needs to reach the bottom, guests can observe their viscosity.

  • Theremin

    The Theremin is an electronic musical instrument controlled without physical contact by the thereminist (performer). It is named after the Westernized name of its Soviet inventor, Léon Theremin, who patented the device in 1928. The instrument’s controlling section usually consists of two metal antennas that sense the relative position of the thereminist’s hands and control oscillators for frequency with one hand, and amplitude with the other. The electric signals from the Theremin are amplified and sent to a loudspeaker. It is considered the most difficult instrument in the world, do you think you can play it?

  • Ferrofluid

    Ferro fluid is the liquid that becomes strongly magnetized in the presence of a magnetic field.  This exciting display of electromagnetism is simple and intriguing but remarkably deep with regard to the huge number of applications that this phenomenon is employed in technology today. From the basic principles of electricity and magnetism to an exploration of modern technology, this piece would be a great extension to a variety of differently themed exhibits. With the turn of two wheels, you can take charge of the movement of the magnets and cause magnificent shapes!

  • Eddy’s currents (Inclined Planes)

    Eddy currents (also called Foucault currents) are loops of electrical current induced within conductors by a changing magnetic field in the conductor, due to Faraday’s law of induction. Eddy currents flow in closed loops within conductors, in planes perpendicular to the magnetic field. This unique interactive exhibit provides your guests with an opportunity not only to see the Eddy Currents, but also permits them to touch and understand it! Make the magnet drop on the iron plates, the inclined one and the two parallel ones and get ready to be amazed…

  • Eddy’s currents (Parallel Planes)

    Eddy currents (also called Foucault currents) are loops of electrical current induced within conductors by a changing magnetic field in the conductor, due to Faraday’s law of induction. Eddy currents flow in closed loops within conductors, in planes perpendicular to the magnetic field. This unique interactive exhibit provides your guests with an opportunity not only to see the Eddy Currents, but also permits them to touch and understand it! Make the magnet drop on the iron plates, the inclined one and the two parallel ones and get ready to be amazed…

  • Hyperbolic Slot

    Swing the Rod slowly by rotating the round handle. Surprise! The inclined Rod passes through the flat plate trough a curved hyperbolic slot. As the Rod spins around, it sweeps a Three-dimensional shape called hyperboloid. A line drawn from the top bottom along the curved edge is called a hyperbola. In fact, it’s the exact hyperbola that the Rod creates when it turns. This amazing looking exhibit makes the mathematics real fun and easy to comprehend!

  • Pythagorean Theorem

    In mathematics, the Pythagorean Theorem, also known as Pythagoras’s theorem, is a fundamental relation in Euclidean geometry among the three sides of a right triangle. It states that the square of the hypotenuse (the side opposite the right angle) is equal to the sum of the squares of the other two sides.  This exhibit turns the theory into a game. Just by turning the triangle in different sides, the water flows from the big square to the smaller ones and vice versa, proving the accuracy of Pythagoras theorem.

  • Square wheel

    We all know square wheels can’t roll, right? Come ride a bumpy road with an exhibit that demonstrates how a wheel works, and why they are round. If you managed to steal a square-wheel from the museum and tried to roll it at home, you’d be disappointed. The wheel would be incredibly difficult to turn, and even if you found a way to turn it, the ride would be jarringly bumpy. That’s because the height of the axles would keep changing. The secret is in our perfectly designed ‘road’ whose curved surface causes the axles to remain always at the same height.

  • The moving images

    Moving Illusions are static images where you can see illusory motion due to color contrasts and shape position. Often, you’ll see waving effect or spinning effect. Using pictures with vertical lining and an extra lined glass on top, we can make the picture come to life and move, only by sliding slowly the glass on top of the picture. Ready for the ride?The process of displaying sequences of still images in rapid succession – to show apparent motion – is the basis of early film animation and motion pictures.

  • Bigger-smaller illusion

    Size Illusions are images where most people can’t compare size of 2 objects correctly because of perspective which might be sometimes deceiving.A ruler might come handy to check how your eyes can deceive you. Measure it yourself! Our eyes, automatically compare the nearest sides, causing the illusion that one is bigger than the other, although if we put them on top of each other we will realize they are exactly the same!

  • Parallel Lines Illusion

    Are the horizontal lines in this exhibit parallel or do they slope down? This is a popular, simple optical illusion that uses black and white effectively to confuse our perceptions of what we are seeing. Because we are trying to rationalize either the black vertical lines or white vertical lines, we cannot make sense of the untidiness of the columns and, to our eyes, the horizontal lines are sloping downwards. Our eyes naturally follow the powerful vertical lines. In fact, the horizontal lines themselves are perfectly straight and using the wheel to put them in the ‘right place’ would prove that they do not slope down at all!

  • True Mirror

    How do other people see us? Is the reflection that we stare in the mirror, the way we really look like? The image we see when we look into a mirror is actually a distorted one. With this impressive exhibit, we can show you the truth. Using two mirrors, united to create a right angle, we cause the needed reflections to portrait the perfect image of how other people see us! Do you dare to face the truth?

  • Mirage

    Complexity is not always needed in order to create an impressive exhibit in a learning environment. With the installation of two parabolic mirrors, facing its other, we can create an almost magical result. For our exhibit, we based on the attribute of the parabolic mirrors to collect all the reflecting light beams to their epicenter. By putting a small object, like a toy car in the center of one of the mirrors, its reflection appears three dimensional in the center of the other mirror, causing a magical effect to everyone who tries to touch it and finds out, it’s not there!

  • Index of Refraction

    As the light travels through different materials its speed diminishes and its direction changes. Refraction Index is our way to measure how much it diminishes and of course it is not the same for all objects. This unique exhibit brings the Index of Refraction into life, causing an immersing transparent tube to look ‘different’ inside water and another disappearing completely immersing in a different, thicker liquid.

  • Newton’s disk

    Equally a display of kinetic art and interactive science exhibit, our spectacular Newton’s Disk brings the theory of one of the biggest scientist in the history, into life! Based on his theory that the white light contains all the other colors of the rainbow, this colorful wheel turns around itself quickly causing all the colors to combine in one, white. This impressive result is caused by a characteristic of the human eye, called afterimage.   Any bright area in your facility will simply come to life with the addition of this beautiful and durable display!

  • The infinite tunnels

    How deep these tunnels are? Where do they end? How many small lights did we use to create this tunnel? In reality, the tunnels are not deep at all. The illusion of their depth is created by the use of two mirrors placed to face each other, a series of small lamps and a wooden hoop! The actual depth of the tunnel is as big as the hoop! The light reflects on the mirror, falls on the opposite one, reflects again and this process goes on and on, causing the tunnel to look much bigger than it actually is! This beautiful exhibit, explains the reflection of light and brightens any room!

  • Plasma ball

    A plasma globe or plasma lamp is (usually) a clear glass sphere filled with a mixture of various noble gases with a high-voltage electrode in the center of the sphere. Plasma filaments extend from the inner electrode to the outer glass insulator, giving the appearance of multiple constant beams of colored light. Guests can experiment by touching the plasma globe, creating fantastic effects! Furthermore, with the use of a long lamp, we can create our own light saber and see how our touch can affect the direction of the electricity. It’s a must have for every museum of Physics and always leaves a great impact on the visitors!

  • The time fountain

    In the time Fountain, using short and frequent blazes of light and a series of water drops, that fall every few seconds, keeping mainly the same distance, we create a magnificent phenomenon, that makes the drops look like they are standing still or even moving backwards! It’s not magic, although it looks like it, and all it needs is a button to put this unique exhibit to work! This technique is common for visual effects, and is an exhibit difficult to forget!

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